Standard Ground Handling Agreement Iata 2013

Many of these changes are only editorial, SGHA Amendment 2013. However, some changes are significant and focus on operational practices, improved standards, training, insolvency, claims and compliance in general. We briefly reviewed the major changes to the main agreement and Schedule B and looked at what they might mean to users. SGHA 2018 has highlighted broader audit rights under Clause 5.9 to allow other carriers within an IATA audit pool to review the handling company in favour of this pool. Currently, there are 37 airlines within the ISAGO Audit Pool, which can benefit from joint audit reports for the same handler at a given airport. SGHA 2018 does not deal entirely with data protection, although the definition of eTickets tickets has been expanded. The initial clause 5.10 of SGHA 2013, which states that “contracting parties agree to comply with all applicable data protection laws when providing services,” has been removed. IATA Standard Stopover Assistance, STANDARD GROUND HANDLING AGREEMENT, IATA Standard Ground Handling Agreement, Standard, Possible Amendment of Article 8, IATA, Ground Handling, STANDARD GROUND HANDLING, International Air Transport Association, IATA Standard Ground Handling Agreement , IATA Standard Ground Handling Agreement – Service Level Agreement, The Standard Ground Handling Agreement SGHA, Ground Operations Safety Manual In 2013, the IATA Ground Handling Council authorized the use of yellow pages to publish pages of text amending the schedule in the new years. SGHA 2018 Appendix B has now fully added the yellow pages to paragraph 8. In the future, this will provide some flexibility in the basic model. However, in practice, it is difficult to imagine, unless an airline has sufficient resources (for example. B of ground support personnel and equipment) who are ready to follow in the footsteps of a well-established operator. Most airlines are thinner and thinner.

The new clause 3.3 of SGHA 2018 prohibits self-help if an institution has already outsourced it under the SGHA. In Europe, for example, the 1996 European Directive on Stopover Assistance (96/67/EC) opened up the market for stopover assistance to competition and maintained the general freedom of the airline to self-manage at an airport. It will be interesting to see how claims are handled and whether internal flight processes are the result of tracking and tracking cargo claims. Improvements can be made when airlines use more detailed documentation requirements for cargo shipments and handling of irregularities (AnnexS A 5.3.1 and 5.7). IATA has explicitly identified its resolutions and standard practices as benchmarks for the provision of services to businesses and has written them down in the new paragraphs 5.3 (a) and (b). Some felt that the wording of the 2013 edition simply meant that a claim for damages from the carrier would be invalidated, unless the recipient had asserted a right within 14/21 days. Others argued that the carrier itself should seek compensation within those time frames.

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